babylon
i'm afraid it's all gonna end terribly
babylon
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harrygouldharveyiv:

danielshea:

adamkremer:

Mute Annotations. 
A group exhibition Curated by Adam Kremer. Presented by V1 Gallery and Bad News at Black Bear Bar.
Works by Meg T Noe, Harry Gould Harvey IV, Daniel Shea Opening reception Friday September 5th 20.00 - 22.00Bad News at Black Bear Bar, 70 N6 Street, Brooklyn NY


Hope to see you Friday :)

Friday in the city <3
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ARREST DARREN WILSON FOR MURDER
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jackvanzet:

Jack Vanzet
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http://www.liderescampesinas.org/media/article-in-ms-magazine.pdf
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aaronhegert:

Aaron Hegert Research and Process 2014
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dekonstruktivisme:

Jacket with multiple sleeves, Niels Klavers autumn—winter 1999—00.
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greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com